Monday, 10 November 2014

Brief Nagoya intermission, part 3: 23 Craft Beerz

(This is part three of my Nagoya posts. Here are parts one and two)

 
This place has recently moved making pretty much everything I wrote kind of useless. I'll strike it through but leave it here as I guess it could help you get a feel for what kind of place the new bar might be. Seems that it's not so central anymore, but I'm sure it's still worth a trip. Map and address are updated to the new location, but the picture is of the old place. Sorry.

I was a little confused at first with this name as they didn't seem to actually have 23 taps, but when we went the second time and sat at the bar, I spotted a couple of handpumps and felt thoroughly reassured. Behind the bar they have 20 taps in addition to the two handpumps and the 23rd is for some reason attached to a fridge out in the seating area. A real beer expert could probably tell you why this is. When we visited they had only 18 on and a few ran out whilst we were there, but it was pretty late on a Friday night, so I guess this is understandable. There were only seven Japanese beers on, so they are offering something a little different compared to the other two places we visited. The import taps were dominated by US imports. I seem to remember there was something Belgian and maybe a Brewdog, but things had got a bit hazy by this stage. In recent times we have been spoilt for choice with the amount of US imports we are getting in Japan. Some of them are definitely not so exciting though and there were a few of those on display here. However, the selection, aside from those ones which I consider to be less interesting, was still pretty good. The fact that they had a stack of Modern Times glasses makes me think that we were possibly just a little unlucky when we went. The place feels bigger than Keg, but there were round about the same amount of seats there (six at the counter, around 30 at tables). Most beers were served in three sizes, small medium and large (I didn't ask about ml. amounts, sorry. I didn't think I was going to post about the Nagoya places). Prices ranged from ¥500-¥800 for the small and ¥900-¥1250 for the large. Unsurprisingly, the price for the medium is somewhere in the middle. The food was nice and reasonably priced. I was delighted to find a pickled egg, as this is something I think I haven't come across outside of the UK. If I lived in Nagoya, this is somewhere I would be visiting quite regularly. The staff were enthusiastic and friendly and I reckon that you'll always be able to find something good to drink here.

Opening Hours:
Monday-Saturday, 17:00-01:00 (maybe from 15:00 on Saturday, but their facebook doesn't match their website, so who knows?)
Closed Sunday

Location/Map:
内山 3-22-11, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya



Telephone:
052-753-6003

Links:
Website
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So, three good places, two particularly good ones. It was nice that we didn't encounter a cover charge anywhere in Nagoya. People say that the prices are a little high, but coming from Tokyo the difference wasn't so apparent. I think Kyoto and Osaka people might notice the difference a little more. Also, all three places were non-smoking which is nice too. There seems to be a trend towards to non-smoking recently which for me is very welcome indeed. Like I said, Nagoya is not so difficult to get to from Tokyo if you take the Shinkansen, but it guess it's not something you could really do every week (unless you are very rich indeed), but it was definitely worth the visit. Y Market is close enough to the main station (10 minutes walk) for you to stop off there for a couple of beers if you are passing through and have a JR rail pass. Perhaps the next time I make it down to Aichi there will be more places open, but with these three, they already have enough to entertain you for a weekend of boozing.

Brief Nagoya intermission, part 2: Keg Nagoya

(This is part two of my Nagoya posts. Here are parts one and three)


Our second stop and one of the three places in Nagoya that are owned by the company that runs Y. Market (the other two being Grillman and naturally, the Y. Market taproom). Keg is a lot smaller than Y. Market, with only 6 seats at the bar and seating for around 30 others. Beers are served in the US measures of 9oz (266ml) and 14oz (414ml), so smaller measures than Y. Market. The prices are generally the same across the board, ¥800 and ¥1200 respectively, so actually pretty expensive. They have 12 taps, all of Japanese craft beer, with some more unusual stuff making an appearance. This is probably the first place I have seen Ohya on tap. They only had one Y. Market beer on and this was one that they were also serving at Y. Market, which was a little disappointing but I guess perfectly understandable. The food seemed pizza focused and the pizza we had was very nice. Apparently this place was the trailblazer of Craft Beer in Nagoya, but I can't help but feel it has got left behind a little bit by newer places. Still a good place to go though, but just seems less exciting as the two other places were very good.

Opening Hours:
Monday-Friday, 11:30-14:00, 17:00-23:00
Saturday, Sunday and holidays, 11:30-22:00 

Location/Map:
1-10-13 東桜, Higashi-ku, Nagoya



Telephone:
052-971-8211

Links:
Website
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Brief Nagoya intermission, part 1: Y. Market

(This is part one of my Nagoya posts. Here are parts two and three. These were originally one post, hence there being a kind of introduction on this one and a conclusion on the third one)

I wasn't going to post about my recent trip to Nagoya, but I was encouraged to do so. This will be a bit less detailed post (actually, now three posts...), than usual, as I think it's a bit out of the remit of this blog, but I guess Nagoya isn't so much further away from Tokyo (at least time-wise, by Shinkansen) than some of the other places I have mentioned. For a more in depth view of Nagoya's best beer destinations, check out the Nagoya Beer Drinker blog (link to be added when someone makes the blog...). After doing my usual pre-trip research on ratebeer and asking some of my friends, it seemed that there were nowhere near as many places in Nagoya as there are in Tokyo; on ratebeer only 15 as opposed to 137 in Tokyo. Although many of these Tokyo places are maybe not worth bothering with. We were only in Nagoya two days, so had to be a bit picky, but it probably speaks volumes that two of the places we went to on the first day, we revisited on the second. So without further ado, hear is my very incomprehensive Nagoya rundown (or at least, part one of my Nagoya rundown. Here are parts two and three).


I would imagine that this would be the first stop for any beer lover visiting Nagoya. In fact this was probably one of the main reasons we went to Nagoya. Y. Market is certainly one of the most exciting new breweries in Japan at the moment. The brewery is on the ground floor and the taproom above it. It's fairly large (on the second day they were closing early for a private party for 70 people so this should give you an idea of the size). There are about 10 seats at the bar and then a selection of tables spread around a light and spacious room. They have eight taps, but only six were on when we were there, so there's room for some expansion, although it seems fairly popular already. Beers were served in two sizes, 330ml for ¥650 and 490ml for ¥950 (price was a tiny bit higher for the 10.2% 'W Market IPA' but not significantly so). The food is mainly Mexican based and not particularly veggie friendly. It was a shame that the usual veggie go-to foods had meat intruding on them (the fries were covered in chicken oil or something like that. Probably exciting for non-vegetarians, but a shame for us). The pickled jalapenos were very nice though, although I couldn't taste much immediately after the first couple of slices. If you like Y. Market beers, and I've yet to find someone who doesn't, it's definitely worth visiting.

Opening Hours:
Monday-Friday, 15:00-23:00
Saturday, Sunday and holidays, 11:30-22:00

Location/Map:
名駅 4-17-6, Nakamura-ku, Nagoya


 
Telephone:
052-533-5151

Links:
Website
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